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Overview

Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction where the body’s defense system attacks the cells that produce insulin. As a result, the body produces very little or no insulin. The exact causes of this are not yet known, but are linked to a combination of genetic and environmental conditions.

Type 1 diabetes can affect people at any age, but usually develops in children or young adults. People with type 1 diabetes need daily injections of insulin to control their blood glucose levels.

Overview

Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction where the body’s defense system attacks the cells that produce insulin. As a result, the body produces very little or no insulin. The exact causes of this are not yet known, but are linked to a combination of genetic and environmental conditions.

Type 1 diabetes can affect people at any age, but usually develops in children or young adults. People with type 1 diabetes need daily injections of insulin to control their blood glucose levels.

Overview

Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction where the body’s defense system attacks the cells that produce insulin. As a result, the body produces very little or no insulin. The exact causes of this are not yet known, but are linked to a combination of genetic and environmental conditions.

Type 1 diabetes can affect people at any age, but usually develops in children or young adults. People with type 1 diabetes need daily injections of insulin to control their blood glucose levels.

Symptoms of type 1
Diabetes

The most common
symptoms of type 1
diabetes include:

Symptoms of type 1 Diabetes

Symptoms of type 1 Diabetes

Treatment of type 1 Diabetes

People with type 1 diabetes require daily insulin treatment, regular blood glucose monitoring and a healthy lifestyle to manage their condition effectively.

Insulin
All people with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin to control their blood glucose levels. There are different types of insulin depending on how quickly they work, when they peak, and how long they last. Insulin is commonly delivered with a syringe, insulin pen or insulin pump.

Treatment of type 1 Diabetes

People with type 1 diabetes require daily insulin treatment, regular blood glucose monitoring and a healthy lifestyle to manage their condition effectively.

Insulin
All people with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin to control their blood glucose levels. There are different types of insulin depending on how quickly they work, when they peak, and how long they last. Insulin is commonly delivered with a syringe, insulin pen or insulin pump.

Treatment of type 1 Diabetes

People with type 1 diabetes require daily insulin treatment, regular blood glucose monitoring and a healthy lifestyle to manage their condition effectively.

Insulin
All people with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin to control their blood glucose levels. There are different types of insulin depending on how quickly they work, when they peak, and how long they last. Insulin is commonly delivered with a syringe, insulin pen or insulin pump.

types of
insulin
include:

― 01
Rapid-acting:
usually taken just before or with a meal.

― 03
Intermediate-acting:
often taken together with a short-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulins start to act within the first hour of injecting, followed by a period of peak activity lasting up to 7 hours.

― 02
Short-acting:
usually taken before meals.

― 04
Long-acting:
insulins that are steadily released and can last in the body for up to 24 hours. They are commonly taken in the morning or in the evening, before going to bed.

types of insulin include:

― 01
Rapid-acting:
usually taken just before or with a meal.

― 02
Short-acting:
usually taken before meals.

― 03
Intermediate-acting:
often taken together with a short-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulins start to act within the first hour of injecting, followed by a period of peak activity lasting up to 7 hours.

― 04
Long-acting:
insulins that are steadily released and can last in the body for up to 24 hours. They are commonly taken in the morning or in the evening, before going to bed.

types of insulin include:

― 01
Rapid-acting:
usually taken just before or with a meal.

― 02
Short-acting:
usually taken before meals.

― 03
Intermediate-acting:
often taken together with a short-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulins start to act within the first hour of injecting, followed by a period of peak activity lasting up to 7 hours.

― 04
Long-acting:
insulins that are steadily released and can last in the body for up to 24 hours. They are commonly taken in the morning or in the evening, before going to bed.

Complications of type 1 Diabetes

Skin complications

Stay alert for symptoms of skin infections and other skin disorders common in people with diabetes.

Eye complications

Keep your risk of glaucoma, cataracts and other eye problems low with regular checkups.

High blood pressure

High blood pressure raises your risk for heart attack, stroke, eye problems, and kidney disease.

Stroke

Maintain target levels for blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol to reduce your risk of stroke.

Neuropathy

Nerve damage from diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy. About half of all people with diabetes have some form of nerve damage.

Foot complications

People with diabetes can develop many different foot problems. Even ordinary problems can get worse and lead to serious complications.

DKA (ketoacidosis) & ketones

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious condition that can lead to a diabetic coma (passing out for a long time) or even death.

Kidney disease (nephropathy)

Keep your diabetes and blood pressure under control to lower the chance of getting kidney disease.

Complications of type 1 Diabetes

Skin complications

Stay alert for symptoms of skin infections and other skin disorders common in people with diabetes.

Eye complications

Keep your risk of glaucoma, cataracts and other eye problems low with regular checkups.

High blood pressure

High blood pressure raises your risk for heart attack, stroke, eye problems, and kidney disease.

Stroke

Maintain target levels for blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol to reduce your risk of stroke.

Neuropathy

Nerve damage from diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy. About half of all people with diabetes have some form of nerve damage.

Foot complications

People with diabetes can develop many different foot problems. Even ordinary problems can get worse and lead to serious complications.

DKA (ketoacidosis) & ketones

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious condition that can lead to a diabetic coma (passing out for a long time) or even death.

Kidney disease (nephropathy)

Keep your diabetes and blood pressure under control to lower the chance of getting kidney disease.

Complications of type 1 Diabetes

Skin complications

Stay alert for symptoms of skin infections and other skin disorders common in people with diabetes.

Eye complications

Keep your risk of glaucoma, cataracts and other eye problems low with regular checkups.

Neuropathy

Nerve damage from diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy. About half of all people with diabetes have some form of nerve damage.

Stroke

Maintain target levels for blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol to reduce your risk of stroke.

High blood pressure

High blood pressure raises your risk for heart attack, stroke, eye problems, and kidney disease.

Foot complications

People with diabetes can develop many different foot problems. Even ordinary problems can get worse and lead to serious complications.

DKA (ketoacidosis)
& ketones

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious condition that can lead to a diabetic coma (passing out for a long time) or even death.

Kidney disease
(nephropathy)

Keep your diabetes and blood pressure under control to lower the chance of getting kidney disease.

Diabetes Solutions

Insulin Pump

You can manage your diabetes and live a long and healthy life by taking care of yourself each day.

Insulin pump helps you control your blood glucose level all the time and protects you from diabetes complications, hypo- and hyperglycemia.

Insulin pump is a small device that mimics some of the ways a healthy pancreas works. It delivers continuous and customized doses of rapid-acting insulin 24 hours a day to match your body’s needs.

Continuous Glucose
Monitoring (CGM)

People with diabetes need to check their blood glucose levels, usually advised at least four times a day, but Fingersticks and A1C show only part of what’s happening.

Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) uncover how food, exercise and medication affect your sugar levels, so your doctor can personalize a treatment plan to better manage your diabetes.

I-Port Advance™ Injection Port

It’s a small and discrete patch that sticks to you like an adhesive bandage. You change the port every three days. This means you don’t need to poke your skin every single time you need to take a shot.

i-Port Advance™ injection port lets you take your medication without having to puncture your skin for each shot. It’s easy to apply and easy to use. The port can be worn for up to three days and during all normal activities, including exercising, sleeping, and bathing.

Diabetes Solutions

Insulin Pump

You can manage your diabetes and live a long and healthy life by taking care of yourself each day.

Insulin pump helps you control your blood glucose level all the time and protects you from diabetes complications, hypo- and hyperglycemia.

Insulin pump is a small device that mimics some of the ways a healthy pancreas works. It delivers continuous and customized doses of rapid-acting insulin 24 hours a day to match your body’s needs.

Continuous Glucose
Monitoring (CGM)

People with diabetes need to check their blood glucose levels, usually advised at least four times a day, but Fingersticks and A1C show only part of what’s happening.

Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) uncover how food, exercise and medication affect your sugar levels, so your doctor can personalize a treatment plan to better manage your diabetes.

I-Port Advance™
Injection Port

It’s a small and discrete patch that sticks to you like an adhesive bandage. You change the port every three days. This means you don’t need to poke your skin every single time you need to take a shot.

i-Port Advance™ injection port lets you take your medication without having to puncture your skin for each shot. It’s easy to apply and easy to use. The port can be worn for up to three days and during all normal activities, including exercising, sleeping, and bathing.

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